watchtheprettylight:

The Trenton Anvil, it’s hardened surface, and some markings. The 1 and 3 on the left foot make sense, it weighs 130lbs(they’d leave off zero). Not sure what symbol is next to it? To the right of that is a serial number. The round stamp says “solid wrought” I believe. If anyone has a copy of Anvils in America and wants to look up the serial number for me I’d appreciate it!

#browndogwelding #anvil #blacksmith #heavymetal

#dirtysmith ?  #rdmironworks ?

dirtysmith:

"It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man."-Ben Franklin #blacksmith #coalforge #hardwork #dontburnmyself (at rorymay.com)

queerboiswag:

sheenvelopesthenight:

ghdos:

hazeleyed1:

vegathebeast:

tytsports:

13-year-old Mo’Ne Davis is about to become just the 17th female to play in the Little League World Series after pitching a three-hitter to lead her team to an 8-0 victory in a Mid-Atlantic Regional championship game. She killed it. 

I see a lot of killings and police brutality all over my dash and raising awareness. But I wanna share some positive stuff going on

Go off sis!

Been meaning to speak on this. But yeah, she’s doing the damn thing. There’s also an all-black team from Chicago that is looking to reach the finals as well, I believe.

She’s badass

Get it girl own em all

That game face she’s wearing in the first frame? I’ve had to wear that a time or two. It works.

I love the owl... Like good storytelling, it's always nice when you can completely convey the message with the fewest amount of lines :)

shopdweller:

Ah thanks. I appreciate that. The owl was part design, part necessity. I had been designing things for years but as I built my shop I realized that most of my ideas really needed a power hammer to complete. (Or a lot of help.) I had to reassess what I could do, considering the tools at hand. It was a great a lesson. I needed to fill half a gallery and I was forced to be creative using simple tools and operations. What the sculpture represents is complex but the production is simple.

This is also why I love making tools. Take hammers for example. There’s really only 3 or 4 operations you use to make a hammer (depending on the style) - punch, drift, fuller, flatter. It’s a simple process but when you’re done you have have an object that fits every academic definition of a sculpture. Beautiful.

» Asked by bitchywelder

shopdweller:

Owl. This is one of my first gallery pieces. Mild steel. Wax finish.

This is, by far, my favorite photo from ‘maddieonthings’. She’s a remarkably (!) tolerant Coonhound whose human takes photographs of her on various things. He’s published a book of his and Maddie’s work, and you can see a bunch more of it here on tumblr at maddieonthings

(Source: elegant-apparatus)

dillonsculpture:

"Ascension" in process

Thanks, dillonsculpture. I’m so glad you posted this. I don’t know if I will ever build anything on this scale, but it’s very helpful for me to see someone else’s work come together. It’s almost magical to see someone’s concept enter the dimensional.

(And plus…. I got through most of the first half of my career thinking to myself: “Shit… if HE can do it, I MOST CERTAINLY can do it!”)

theimpossiblecool:

“Never interrupt someone doing something you said couldn’t be done.” 

Amelia Earhart. 

rockon-ro:

Campo del Cielo iron meteorite.  Structural classification is coarse octahedrite. The slice displays the classic Widmanstatten pattern (a.k.a. Thomson structure) found in some iron-nickel meteorites. This pattern results from the interweaving of crystals from two iron alloys, kamacite (low nickel) and taenite (high nickel). The Widmanstatten pattern is diagnostic of meteorites as this pattern cannot be duplicated in laboratories on Earth. To expose this pattern I first sliced the meteorite in half. Using various grades of emery cloth I polished the face of the sliced piece to a mirror finish. After polishing, the surface was etched with a 1:2 ratio mixture of 10% hydrochloric acid and 3% hydrogen peroxide. This creates a strong oxidizer in the presence of an acid, which is able to slowly eat away the iron. The varing rates of corrosion between the different iron alloys (kamacite and taenite) creates the Widmanstatten pattern of inter-locking iron crystals. The lower photo shows the intact meteorite. The middle photo shows the polished slice. The top photo shows the iron crystals that appear after etching.