This is, by far, my favorite photo from ‘maddieonthings’. She’s a remarkably (!) tolerant Coonhound whose human takes photographs of her on various things. He’s published a book of his and Maddie’s work, and you can see a bunch more of it here on tumblr at maddieonthings

(Source: elegant-apparatus)

dillonsculpture:

"Ascension" in process

Thanks, dillonsculpture. I’m so glad you posted this. I don’t know if I will ever build anything on this scale, but it’s very helpful for me to see someone else’s work come together. It’s almost magical to see someone’s concept enter the dimensional.

(And plus…. I got through most of the first half of my career thinking to myself: “Shit… if HE can do it, I MOST CERTAINLY can do it!”)

theimpossiblecool:

“Never interrupt someone doing something you said couldn’t be done.” 

Amelia Earhart. 

rockon-ro:

Campo del Cielo iron meteorite.  Structural classification is coarse octahedrite. The slice displays the classic Widmanstatten pattern (a.k.a. Thomson structure) found in some iron-nickel meteorites. This pattern results from the interweaving of crystals from two iron alloys, kamacite (low nickel) and taenite (high nickel). The Widmanstatten pattern is diagnostic of meteorites as this pattern cannot be duplicated in laboratories on Earth. To expose this pattern I first sliced the meteorite in half. Using various grades of emery cloth I polished the face of the sliced piece to a mirror finish. After polishing, the surface was etched with a 1:2 ratio mixture of 10% hydrochloric acid and 3% hydrogen peroxide. This creates a strong oxidizer in the presence of an acid, which is able to slowly eat away the iron. The varing rates of corrosion between the different iron alloys (kamacite and taenite) creates the Widmanstatten pattern of inter-locking iron crystals. The lower photo shows the intact meteorite. The middle photo shows the polished slice. The top photo shows the iron crystals that appear after etching.

My name is Barbara, and I DON’T LIKE SOCCER!

(Source: jenbarbers)

I think selfies are just kind of odd. I can’t even bring myself to look directly at the camera. (I tried, but the results were: delete, delete, and holyhellDELETE!)

image

All the rest of the work that actually finishes the job.

Click on the photos to embiggen and show captions. 

(Heh…’embiggen’: my new favorite non-word. Makes me giggle like a schoolgirl.)

fightsteelwithfire:

antique-erotic:

As the first animated blacksmith I shared here was rather well-enjoyed, I thought it was time to include another - this time two work together to hammer the hot steel much more efficiently. Again made from a set of sequential photographs taken in the 1870s by Eadweard Muybridge (Animal Locomotion vol II, plate 337).

The most natural way of working.

I just about killed myself laughing over this GIF…. maybe because of the shirts you can get at #dirtysmith 

fightsteelwithfire:

antique-erotic:

As the first animated blacksmith I shared here was rather well-enjoyed, I thought it was time to include another - this time two work together to hammer the hot steel much more efficiently. Again made from a set of sequential photographs taken in the 1870s by Eadweard Muybridge (Animal Locomotion vol II, plate 337).

The most natural way of working.



I just about killed myself laughing over this GIF…. maybe because of the shirts you can get at #dirtysmith 

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)